Wednesday, January 5, 2011

Where do I put my images?

One of the interesting things about the internet is the multiple of channels for presenting art.

As a digital content producer, as opposed to a digital consumer, I spend a huge amount of time assessing, uploading, organising and linking image and text about my and others art.

The challenge is finding the best website or services which:

1) are visually pleasant (ie not cluttered with advertising)

2) easy to navigate (see all thumbnails, flick between larger images, dig down to descriptions, post comments etc)

3) are seen by the right audience (eg peers vs collectors vs art administrators vs publishers vs art loving public, prospective students vs current students vs friends).

As a guide of some of the possibilities out there I provide the following examples to you:

my website I used to put thumbnails, so those on dialup could quickly see all (small) images. Then as broadband rolled out I inserted larger images below with descriptions. Note how (usually) you could only see one large image at a time as you scroll down (lit walking to each sculpture in a gallery.



Paperclay Sculptures on the Behance Network A Creative Professional Platform. In my mind a relatively untested venue.

Paperclay Sculptures on Facebook and Compressed Paper Sculptures on Facebook


I put both up so you can see how they have received different levels of comments (at the bottom). While it is great to see the comments and who made them, it's hard to gauge the response of those who may have looked, but not commented. Is there a website where you can track numbers, source and time on each image? Ideally this would give me the feedback I get to your art from being in the crowd at my own exhibition, or by babysitting my own exhibition.

Flickr

Flickr is a photocentric service, but not good for much else


One I'm currently looking more closely at the moment is the loop, which is an Australia/NZ Creative Industries focused website (a rare thing). This link will explain who, what, why.

Your comments/advise/suggestions are welcome as I continue to add/edit this post (become a Follower-make this less public discussion than Facebook walls).

Ah, someone thinking along the same lines:

"The greatest challenge we will face is how to measure the quality of talent. The solution will be community curation. Aided by tools like Digg, Facebook's "Like" button, and the "Appreciate" feature on Behance.net, communities are starting to curate themselves. Anything from articles to pieces of art can now be sorted based on consensus.

But the insights of the critical mass aren't enough. For example, when evaluating the quality of a photograph, the opinions of 1,000 photographers should matter more than that of 1,000,000 random people. This is the difference between a "critical mass" and a "credible mass." The "credible mass" will enable creative professionals around the globe to get new opportunities based on the quality of their work." source: article by Scott Belsky

Translate

Search This Blog